AIP Pumpkin Muffins

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These pumpkin muffins come courtesy of our friend Mary Lapp, an original member of the AIP blogging community. When she decided to transition her website to focus on new endeavors, she wanted to know if we’d be happy hosting some of her classic recipes, and of course we said yes!

This is a fantastic base recipe that makes lovely muffins or even a cake. What I love about Mary’s recipes is that she gives lots of instructions and options for substitutions. I’ve edited this recipe to reflect my favorite combination, but you can see her suggestions in the “notes” section at the bottom of the page.


5.0 from 3 reviews
AIP Pumpkin Muffins
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 12 muffins
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and prepare a muffin tin.
  2. Add the water and applesauce to the bottom of a small saucepan and stir to combine. Sprinkle with the gelatin, and set aside to "bloom" for a few minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, combine the cassava flour, coconut sugar, arrowroot, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt in a large bowl and stir to combine. In a medium-sized bowl, combine the pumpkin and avocado oil, using a whisk to combine.
  4. When the gelatin has been absorbed by the liquid, turn the heat on the lowest setting and continuously whisk to combine as the mixture gently heats up. When the gelatin has completely dissolved (slightly warmer than room temperature), turn off the heat and combine with the pumpkin mixture before combining all of the wet and dry ingredients together. Your batter will be a touch drier than traditional cake or muffin batter; this is normal.
  5. Use a spoon to fill 9-12 muffin cups with batter. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean.
  6. When they are finished cooking, cool for 10 minutes in the pan before transferring to a wire rack. Allow to fully cool to develop the right texture.
Notes
Flour Substitution Options:

1/2 cup tigernut flour, ½ cup cassava flour, ½ cup arrowroot flour
1½ cups cassava flour
1 cup cassava flour, ½ cup tigernut flour

 

About Mickey Trescott

Mickey Trescott is a co-founder here at Autoimmune Wellness. After recovering from her own struggle with both Celiac and Hashimoto’s disease, adrenal fatigue, and multiple vitamin deficiencies, Mickey started to write about her experience to share with others and help them realize they are not alone in their struggles. She is a certified Nutritional Therapy Practitioner by the Nutritional Therapy Association, and is the author of three best-selling books--The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook, The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook, and The Nutrient-Dense Kitchen. You can watch her AIP cooking demos and get a glimpse of life on the farm by following her on Instagram.

26 comments

  • Megan says

    Does it really call for a full cup of coconut sugar? It just sounded like a lot of sugar. Thanks!

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Megan,
      Yes, and it makes 12 muffins or a small cake!

  • Mitzi Marquez says

    Can coconut or almond flour be used as a substitute?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Mitzi, I doubt coconut flour would work (the texture is very different) but almond might work – I haven’t tried it personally though. Let us know if you discover anything food!

  • Heather says

    So is this recipe safe for the 1st phase of the diet? Sounds delish!! I am fairly new at this. It calls for coconut sugar, and I thought honey and maple syrup were the only 2 sweeteners allowed. Are all the recipes on this site supposed to be for the 1st, most restricted phase? Thanks!
    Heather

    • Angie Alt says

      Heather-
      We saw you asked this question in another spot too. Yes, coconut sugar is compliant. Yes all the recipes on the site are elimination phase compliant. AIP is not a no-sugar protocol, but it is a low-sugar protocol & we try to focus on sweeteners that have some nutritive qualities. Thanks for being here!

      • Heather says

        Angie,
        Thanks for the timely response! I was having some internet issues and didn’t think my first comment went through, so I posted it again when I was reading on your site. Sorry about that! 🙂 There is so much information here, and I am so thankful to have access to it! I am definitely going to make these muffins soon! THANK YOU for the recipes, all the helpful info, and sharing your stories! I have a lot to learn, but I’ll get there!
        Heather

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Heather! Everything we post here is elimination-phase compliant. Honey, maple, and coconut sugar are all allowed in moderation.

  • Susan A Inks says

    Can the avocado oil be substituted with coconut oil? Thanks, Sue

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Susan, I would start by trying a mild-flavored olive oil, but coconut oil may work too.

  • Kimberly says

    The recipe calls for 1 cup cassava flour but the substitute options say 1 1/2 cups. Is the extra 1/2 a cup to replace the gelatin?
    Thanks. I am excited to try this out.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Kimberly,
      That version would be 1 1/2 cups to replace the 1/2 cup arrowroot flour! Hope it helps.

  • Sherrie says

    Hi there,
    I’m seeing gelatin used in a lot of baking recipes and am curious what its purpose is or what it does in baked goods. I would love to try these but don’t have gelatin. Is there a substitution? Thanks!

    • Angie Alt says

      Sherrie-
      The gelatin replaces egg in a lot of AIP baking. Other substitutes will probably change the texture of these.

  • mom2one says

    Hi Angie and Mickey, what do you know about oxalates? I had a Organic Acid Test done and it came back with high levels of oxalates. I’ve since had to go on a low oxalate diet and have found that the foods that were once staples in my AIP/Paleo diet (i.e. cassava flour, arrowroot powder, cinnamon, spinach, sweet potatoes, etc.) were very high in oxalates. I’ve noticed lot of my symptoms improving since cutting out a lot of these high oxalate foods. I just wondered if there isn’t more of a connection with oxalates and autoimmune symptoms.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi! I have done some exploring about oxalates, but personally, and in my work with clients, I have found their potential to cause issues overblown. A lot of the foods you mention are also high in starch, which I do know many folks can react to because of dysbiosis. Personally I would rule out gut issues working with a skilled practitioner versus cutting out a lot of vegetables that also happen to be quite nutrient-dense. An exception would be folks who suffer from kidney stones they know are caused by oxalates. Dr. Ballantyne has a great article here you may find informative: https://www.thepaleomom.com/oxalate-sensitivity-real/
      Hope it helps!

  • Babz says

    I made these muffins yesterday and couldn’t wait to eat one, so I ate it before it cooled completely. It tasted great, but the texture was a little mushy near the bottom. After I let them cool completely I froze them and thawed a couple in the microwave this morning for about 40 seconds (on high). And you are absolutely right – the texture improved by letting them cool completely – they were absolutely perfect!

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Babz – that is a funny thing about AIP baking – cooling is almost as important as cooking! Good to hear they turned out for you!

  • Laura G. says

    I really needed to have a treat that I could tolerate and saw the recipe for these muffins. I wasn’t sure if they would come out the way they looked, but they did. I enjoy the taste and are perfect when I just need something to satisfy my craving. I will definitely be making these again! Thank you.

  • Jenny Klug says

    I made these. The first batch I took out of the pan before the 10 minutes. The second batch I left them in. There was a difference in the texture to be sure. Letting them cool is key. They taste wonderful, you just have to expect them to be a little “spongy”. I will be making these on a regular basis. Thanks for the recipe.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Thanks for sharing the results of your experiment Jenny! I agree, cooling is a whole part of the process with AIP desserts and necessary for the right texture.

  • Lisa Rose says

    can we use agar instead of gelatin?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Lisa, I’ve never used agar, but you are welcome to experiment!

  • Karen Hanna says

    Hi! Is it possible to leave out the coconut sugar or substitute it with honey or maple syrup?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Karen! No, you can’t substitute solid sugar for liquid sugar in baking recipes. While all sugars don’t behave the same, if you are looking to run your own experiment and try a swap, you should try something like maple sugar or date sugar instead of the coconut sugar.

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