Hamburger Soup

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I ask you, when there’s a nip in the air, is there anything more wonderful than a warming bowl of soup?  If you’ve been around me for a while, you know that I’m a huge soup fan.  It’s maybe one of my favorite one-dish meals.  I even have it for breakfast sometimes!

My first experience with hamburger soup was on a camping trip.  My mother-in-law made hamburger soup on our little camp stove.  As I recall, there was lots of red wine that evening; in the soup, and in us!  She put the raw ground beef and uncooked pasta noodles in the pot with the vegetables, and everything just sort of cooked together.  It was kind of magical, eating this simple, delicious, and warming soup around the campfire as we sipped wine.  Good times.

Fast forward, decades later.  No more wine.  No more pasta.  But WAIT!  There is now an AIP pasta on the market.  THIS IS NOT A DRILL, PEOPLE.  Jovial, a company that makes gluten free pastas, has come out with cassava pasta.  Real pasta!  So that’s the fusilli pasta in this recipe.

May this soup warm and nourish you, and bring to mind special times with family.


Hamburger Soup
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 4
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. In a large pot over medium high heat, brown the hamburger with the onion, carrot, celery, and salt.
  2. When hamburger is browned and onions are translucent, add pumpkin, beet, vinegar, and basil. Stir to combine. Add broth and pasta. Stir again.
  3. Reduce heat to medium low. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes. Taste for salt, and adjust, if desired. Serve with some AIP-friendly crackers and fresh fruit.

 

About Wendi Washington-Hunt

Wendi lives in an increasingly emptying nest with one wonderful husband, one amazing teenage daughter, and one spoiled yellow lab, who appears in nearly every episode of her cooking show on YouTube. By day, she is a mild-mannered piano teacher; by night, an autoimmune kitchen warrior. Before autoimmune disease entered her life, she was a martial arts practitioner, and had a career as an opera singer. Her active lifestyle included running and weight lifting. Then she was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. She began researching ways to take her health into her own hands. During a serendipitous encounter with an associate at a book store, she learned about the Autoimmune Protocol. Soon, AIP cooking became both the start of healing, and a creative outlet. She believes that humor, loving relationships and fabulous foods are essential for healing. Find her at her website, Instagram, Facebook, or YouTube.

2 comments

  • Kathleen Weber says

    Although I’ve not made this recipe, it sounds delicious. I use a similar recipe from another AIP healing cookbook. My comment is about the price of the Jovial Cassava Fusilli: over $9 per 8 oz. box! I cannot justify this price when there are children in the U.S. that go hungry every day. An alternative is to make a tapioca or arrowroot and coconut flour (along with other ingredients) dumpling that is dropped into the hot broth. Their consistency is similar to that of pot stickers. They are a fraction of the cost of the recommended fusilli. Paleo cooking can be expensive. Let’s make it more affordable so that more warriors can join us in our efforts.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hey Kathleen! Thanks for the comment, and to address your concern with the price, we hope we are making it clear that it is not a requirement to use expensive cooking ingredients to heal with AIP. That being said, some folks are happy to spend their money to have a treat or something that feels “special” and helps them cope with not having to have some of their favorites long-term. Food access and insecurity is a BIG issue in our community, and one that we’ll continue to address next year. You can read this post for a start: https://autoimmunewellness.com/food-insecurity-and-the-autoimmune-protocol/

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