Cranberry Crumble Bars

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Looking for a crowd-pleasing, seasonal dessert to share with family and friends this holiday season? I’ve got you covered!

Although I’m not a huge sweet treat person, I miss the crumble bars of my days before food allergies. I used to love that combination of a gooey filling with a soft, sweet, flaky crust. Lucky for you guys, I’ve been hard at work creating a recipe that fits this bill!

The crust I use in this recipe is something I am particularly proud of, and very adaptable — I’ve used it for pie crusts as well as shortbread cookies. It is made with cassava flour, and you can find my favorite brand Otto’s Cassava Flour both on Amazon and in their online store. You could easily bake a crumble using any seasonal fruit as the base, and the dough on top. Let your imagination run wild!

A couple of notes… yes, you can use fresh cranberries here! I just call for frozen for ease of accessibility. Watch your cooking time with fresh cranberries as it may thicken up sooner.

Also, this recipe is “share with your non-AIP friends/family” sweet. I’ve tested it out with my non-AIP friends and family and everyone told me they wouldn’t feel deprived or unhappy if this was served at a family gathering instead of a glutinous counterpart. I wanted to create a recipe that would easily make everyone happy at a holiday celebration, no “excuses” or explanations needed.

If you are making just for yourself and you don’t care to go full celebration-sweet, you can absolutely get away with 1/2-3/4 of the honey called for in the recipe. Enjoy!

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5.0 from 4 reviews
Cranberry Crumble Bars
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 9 squares
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Make sure your ingredients are warmed and pourable. I like to use a warm water bath for 10 minutes to get everything soft. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Place the coconut concentrate, honey, coconut oil, and lemon juice in a food processor and process until combined. You can also use a bowl and whisk here.
  3. Place the cassava flour, baking soda, and sea salt (leave out the coconut sugar) in a small bowl together and combine. Add about three-quarters of the dry mixture to the food processor or mixing bowl, and pulse or mix until just combined. Don't overmix, this is how the crust turns out flaky! Add the remaining mixture and pulse once to combine.
  4. Scoop out half of the crust mixture into a square 8 x 8 baking dish lined with parchment paper. Your mixture should be crumbly, but form together nicely. Using your hands or a spatula, press the mixture to form an even layer on the bottom, working into the corners. Bake for 10 minutes.
  5. While the base is baking, place all of the filling ingredients in a saucepan on medium heat. Bring to a boil and cook, stirring, for 10-15 minutes until the mixture becomes thick and sticky.
  6. Pour the filling on top of the base, using a spatula to spread evenly over the surface.
  7. Sprinkle the coconut sugar over the remaining crust in the food processor or bowl. Pulse once to barely incorporate. Preserving the crumbly texture of the mixture by using your hands, pour on top of the filling. Don't press, but work the crumbles in to cover all the surface area. Bake for 15 minutes, or until lightly browned on top.
  8. Remove from oven, score into 9 squares with a knife, and let cool to room temperature before serving.
Notes
Make sure you use coconut concentrate for this recipe, otherwise known as coconut manna or coconut butter. It will not work with the top of a can of coconut milk! This recipe stores well refrigerated, although it tastes best at room temperature.

 

About Mickey Trescott

Mickey Trescott is a cook and one of the bloggers behind Autoimmune Paleo. After recovering from her own struggle with both Celiac and Hashimoto’s disease, adrenal fatigue, and multiple vitamin deficiencies, Mickey started to write about her experience to share with others and help them realize they are not alone in their struggles. She is a certified Nutritional Therapy Practitioner by the Nutritional Therapy Association, and is the author of The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook, a guide and recipe book for the autoimmune protocol, and AIP Batch Cook, a video-based batch cooking program. You also can find her on Instagram.

29 comments

  • Teresa says

    Thanks for this recipe! Looks delicious. Just have one question. I don’t like coconut. With all of the coconut-derived products in this recipe, does it taste like coconut? I have found coconut oil that does not taste like coconut, but I’m not sure about the other items. Thanks!

    • Angie Alt says

      Teresa-
      I’ve made Mickey’s recipe many times & I don’t find it tastes like coconut. The fruit is a stronger flavor.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Teresa! Yes, this recipe has a little coconutty taste and there really isn’t a replacement for the concentrate. Check our recipe archives for a couple of coconut-free desserts – there are molasses cookies as well as a pumpkin cake!

  • Hi Mickey – just wondered if I could use dried cranberries in this as I have a huge bag? Thank you for this recipe. Think it will work really well at Thanksgiving. Blessings.

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Louise,
      The dried ones won’t substitute, unfortunately, although you could run an experiment by reconstituting some in warm coconut oil to see if they would thicken and moisten up?

  • I would love to try this recipe but I’m highly sensitive to yucca I’m wondering what else I can use in its place?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Michael! I’m sorry, but I would choose a different recipe to make, as the texture here from the cassava flour is very unique. I’d try something with more of a coconut base!

  • […] Cranberry Crumble Bars from Autoimmune Paleo *This crumble is a perfectly festive treat. […]

  • […] Cranberry Crumble Bars (AutoimmunePaleo) […]

  • Julie says

    These look amazing! Awesome photos and recipe, can’t wait to try them, looks like a great holiday treat. Thanks for posting Mickey!

  • Sgelley says

    Mickey, I made these last night and they are delicious!! Even my husband (who does not follow AIP) had two! He said they were great. As someone who just started following AIP to help my Hashi’s it is great to have such a wonderful resource for recipes. Thanks to you and Angie for doing what you do. It is much appreciated.

  • Sabrina says

    Would fresh cranberries work instead of frozen? I bought too many on sale before thanksgiving 🙂

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Sabrina, Yes, although you may want to watch the filling and add a touch of water if it gets too dry!

  • Bethany says

    Would vanilla extract (alcohol free) work instead of the powder? Can’t wait to make these!

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Bethany! I think it would, but I haven’t personally tried it. Good luck!

  • Laura says

    This recipe looks lovely. My husband would really like me to give it a try. Would it be possible to use tapioca flour instead of cassava? I am really not a good baker and I am confused regarding the difference between the two?
    Thank you for posting this recipe!
    Laura

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Laura! Unfortunately tapioca flour is not going to have the right consistency. I haven’t found anything yet that subs well for cassava – it is very unique, and actually very much like real flour!

  • Patti says

    Hi Laura,
    I was thinking of getting the book but it seems like there are a lot of special ingredients to buy. I have never heard of vanilla powder or the flour it calls for. I have most every flour except this one. I don’t want to spend a lot of money on special ingredients.
    I’m gluten free and it’s expensive enough and I also have an also auto immune disease.
    I will check out the other ones the pumpkin sounds good.
    Thank you

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Patti!
      We don’t use cassava flour in the book–in fact, you can get all the ingredients year round, at almost any grocery store (including Wal Mart). We wanted the recipes to be accessible. This one is attempting to recreate a particular pastry, and the cassava flour is the closest I’ve found to actual wheat flour. If you don’t have it or want to get any, we have many desserts in our recipe archive with more “normal” flours. Good luck!

  • Lidia says

    I have a question just been dx with Psoriatic Arthitis, and have do to this diet AIP, till how many days into the diet can I use the Cassava flour?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Lidia! Cassava is included on the elimination diet, so you are good to go! Good luck with everything.

  • Jamie says

    These are super yummy!!!
    My husband is not a huge fan of cranberries. Could I substitute blueberries for him? Would I use the same amount?

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Jamie, I haven’t tried it, but it could work! I would guess it would be sweeter since the cranberries are a little more tart. Report back if you decide to try!

      • Jamie says

        I substituted blueberries for the cranberries and used 1/3 cup of lemon juice instead of 1/4 cup. They turned out really well! Definitely less tart, but still some zip. I like tart, and my husband sweet…so if he had his way, the lemon juice would stay the same. Either way, I don’t think you can go wrong!

  • Carolina says

    Hi,

    I have a doute, is Cassava ok for Hashimoto?

    Thanks,

    Carolina

    • Mickey Trescott says

      Hi Carolina! We aren’t medical practitioners and can’t claim a particular food is good for a disease. Many of us find that we have sensitivities to individual foods after going through an elimination diet. Cassava is included on the elimination diet, but some may still react to it for another reason (such as cross reaction for those with celiac disease). Hope it helps!

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