Slow Cooker Chicken and Squash Soup

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It’s fall! In my neck of the woods the leaves are at peak color, the nights are noticeably colder, and the days have been drizzly and overcast. This season makes me want to curl up inside with a warm blanket and read a book while the smells from my slow cooker fill the house.

There is just nothing that beats the aromas from a slow cooker that’s been simmering dinner throughout the day. Maybe part of the reason I love it so much is that I know dinner is already made! I think you’ll love the ease of this squash soup recipe, the big helping of autumn veggies, and, of course, the yummy smell filling the house on a cool fall day.

Slow Cooker Chicken and Squash Soup
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Author:
Serves: 4-6 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 lb raw chicken thighs
  • 4 cups peeled, chopped butternut squash
  • 1 cup peeled, chopped carrot
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 cups chopped mushrooms
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh sage
  • 4 cups chicken bone broth
  • 2 cups chopped, packed kale (stems removed)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients, except kale and lemon juice, in slow cooker, stir to combine.
  2. Cover and cook on high for 4 hours or on low for 7 hours.
  3. When cooking has finished, remove chicken thighs with a slotted spoon. Rough chop chicken (which should easily fall apart).
  4. Add chopped chicken, kale, and lemon juice to slow cooker. Stir to combine and wilt kale. Enjoy!

 

About Angie Alt

Angie Alt is a co-founder here at Autoimmune Wellness. She helps others take charge of their health the same way she took charge of her own after suffering with celiac disease, endometriosis, and lichen sclerosis; one nutritious step at a time. Her special focus is on mixing “data with soul” by looking at the honest heart of the autoimmune journey (which sometimes includes curse words). She is a Certified Health Coach through the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, Nutritional Therapy Consultant through The Nutritional Therapy Association and author of The Alternative Autoimmune Cookbook: Eating for All Phases of the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol and The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook. You can also find her on Instagram.

4 comments

  • Gidget says

    should they be boneless thighs? How about using chicken breast?

    • Angie Alt says

      Gidget, boneless thighs are easiest. You can sub chicken breast, but it will not be as flavorful.

  • Karen Brooks says

    This may sound like a silly question, but why use thighs instead of chicken breasts? I’m kind of new to all of this and have not used thighs much. Also, why bone in meat? Thanks for all your hard work to keep us all healthy!
    ~Karen

    • Angie Alt says

      Hi Karen-
      Chicken thighs are generally a bit fattier than breast, which equates to more flavor. And you don’t necessarily have to get them bone-in, just like we can get boneless chicken breast, you can purchase boneless thigh meat for this recipe too. Hope that helps!

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